Fermented Pickles – Diving Right In

Sometimes projects require a reasonable amount of research. Sometimes you can just dive right in. Sometimes, you dive right in whether or not a project requires a reasonable amount of research. Such is the case with my fermented pickles. I selected the recipe from Marisa McClellan’s NPR interview.  And then I went to town.

I used two quart jars, like the recipe said. The recipe calls for Kirby cucumbers. I have never seen cucumbers specified like that, so I just went to the farmers market Saturday morning and bought about 8 or so small-ish cukes. Only 4 packed into each jar. Since fermented pickles are new to me, I wasn’t too concerned about quantity. Truly, 8 whole dill pickles will see our family a long way (they’re good for up to a year in the fridge). Or maybe not, if they’re just wonderful.

What would following a recipe be if you don’t change it up a bit? The dill seed ended before the cucumbers, so dill weed stepped in for Jar 2. That’s it – the only recipe modification.

Meet Dill Seed – she’s bashful and likes to keep things simple.

I’m not sure how well Dill Seed (right) will get along with Dill Weed (left). He’s wild and woolly, plays fast and loose, and most of his rash decisions leave him in a pickle.

After I dove into this project, I read somewhere that fermentation is best when the inside temperature is between 60-70 degrees. Our home is mostly just a little warmer than 70. The mixtures have not had vigorous bubbling, but there has been some. There isn’t much scrim to skim off the top, though. Reporting back soon on the taste test…

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